Burning questions about teaching English in China #9: We are families!

Burning questions about teaching English in China #9: We are families!
Puzzler #9: Why do Chinese students think they have more than one family? Here’s another error I have seen fairly often — something like: I can’t wait to go home and see my families. While it is possible for someone to have more than one family — a person who was adopted, for example — usually each person has only one family. “Family” in English is a collective noun, which represents a collection of individual members. Your family consists of your parents, children, spouse, grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc. So, probably you are going home to see your family, just as I am right now. In the case of an adoptee or a foster child, he or she might have an adopted or foster family and a birth family. So, such a person could legitimately say they have two families, meaning two unrelated groups of family members. The rest of us make do with just one. Collective nouns can be considered plural or singular, grammatically speaking, which determines the verb form following the noun. As usual, English does not make this easy, as American and British usage differ. AmE: My family is in Kentucky now. (singular noun) BrE: My family are ...

Burning questions about teaching English in China #8: You can never back home again 2

Burning questions about teaching English in China #8: You can never back home again
Puzzler #8: Why do students misuse the adverb “back?” Another common student mistake is the improper use of “back” as a free-standing verb, which of course it can be, but not in the sense most students use it. Again, it seems such an easy thing to correct early on in English education that I wondered if some texts and dictionaries have the usage wrong. It is that widespread of an error. So, I did a little research. My YouDao Cidian app gives as the first definition of “back” 回来 huílai: to return, to come back. Already this is a problem, because “back” requires a verb to convey the sense of returning somewhere. But, going from Chinese to English gives the correct usage, “come back,” as shown above. Baidu, meanwhile, offers as the first definition, 后面 hòumiàn: rear, back, behind, later. It correctly uses “back” as an adverb to mean “return”: She went back to her parents’ house. The Sogou search engine follows Baidu’s example, and gives the correct usage. So, the puzzle remains. Why do so many Chinese students get this wrong? After all, “to go/come back” is a very common phrasal verb in English, and one they would learn ...

Burning questions about teaching English in China #7: I ever visited Beijing

Burning questions about teaching English in China #7: I ever visited Beijing
Puzzler #7: Once and ever So far I’ve discussed confusion among Chinese students about he and she, how to spell “true” and “know,” how to write the letter “E,” when to use “let” and “make,” and how a “vocation” is not a fun “vacation.” Here’s another pair of words I see students often mix up. While native speakers usually have no trouble distinguishing the words “once” and “ever,” Chinese learners seem to have a harder time, because “ever” has multiple meanings, one of which is similar to a meaning of “once.” (See album cover above.) I’ll try to clear things up. “Once” and “twice” (and “thrice”) belong to the same family, so to speak. Once means “one time,” twice, “two times,” etc. Once and twice (and their shy sister, thrice, who hardly ever (ha!) appears in public) refer to distinct occasions or events in time. Please press the button only once. (That is, one time.) [By the way, the word “only” also comes from the word “one.” In Old English (pre-1066) “one” was spelled an and “only” was anlic. Old English an (one) also gave us the indefinite articles “a” and “an,” which each mean “one of something.”] But that ...

Burning questions about teaching English in China #6: You say vocation, I say vacation

Burning questions about teaching English in China #6: You say vocation, I say vacation
Puzzler #6: Why do Chinese like to take “vocations”? Now that it’s the summer holiday for students and teachers (Yay!), let’s talk about another pair of commonly confused words here in China – and maybe elsewhere. They differ by only one letter, so I suppose that is one explanation why they are so often confused. But, as which “make” and “let”, their meanings are almost the opposite of each other. So, using one in the place of the other makes you look rather foolish. A vacation /vei ‘kei ʃən/ is a break from your everyday work. A vocation /vou ‘kei ʃən/ IS your work. Here are some photos to make the distinction even more clear. A vocation is not just an ordinary job. We don’t say a factory worker or a sales clerk has a vocation. We use the word specifically to describe a specific kind of occupation, one requiring a special dedication or sense of responsibility. The examples I gave above are monk (or nun), priest (or Pope), and doctor (or nurse). Both “vocation” and “vacation” come from the Latin language, which was the common language of the Roman Catholic Church – and of Europe – for hundreds of ...

Burning questions about teaching English in China #5: You can’t let me!

Burning questions about teaching English in China #5: You can't let me!
Puzzler #5: Why do students confuse the verbs “make” and “let”? Moving on from spelling errors and interesting ways to write letters, here’s a common error in vocabulary usage. This one puzzles me, because I had assumed the meanings of “make” and “let” are pretty clear. In fact, the two verbs are almost opposite in meaning. Yet, many students get them confused. Perhaps the trouble lies with dictionary definitions, because in looking at my own Chinese-English dictionaries, I can see their definitions could be confusing. For example, under “make” I see the Chinese word 让 ràng, which can mean “to let sb do sth.” Under the word “let,” I see the same Chinese word 让 ràng with the additional meaning of “to have sb do sth.” So, I can see how a beginning learner of English could confuse the two words. Bilingual dictionaries are great for quickly finding the meanings of words, but they often do a poor job of showing how those words are most commonly used. In fact, even the Merriam-Webster dictionary (English-to-English) can be confusing to a non-native speaker. Here is where textbooks and teachers need to step in and teach correct usage. “Make” and “let” are ...

Burning questions about teaching English in China #4: A B C D Ƶ F G

Burning questions about teaching English in China #4: A B C D Ƶ F G
This is the fourth in a series of articles about some of the puzzling aspects of teaching English as a Foreign Language in China. You can find the previous entries linked below. Puzzler #4: Why do some Chinese students write “E” with its “hat” on backwards? Like the misspellings “ture” (for “true”) and “konw” for “know”, this peculiar way of writing the upper case E has popped up in my classes each year I have taught here. Again, I have no idea why or how some students acquire this habit, because they have all presumably learned the alphabet in primary school. Could it be because some students are naturally left-handed? Is it because of Chinese character stroke order? Have computers and cellphones ruined their penmanship? Or are they just being careless? Strangely, I have not seen students write uppercase “F” in the same fashion. It’s generally written in the standard way, in manuscript form anyway. [NOTE: For my non-Chinese readers, students here learn the manuscript Latin alphabet, and by high school apparently learn a kind of italic handwriting for English. They do not learn cursive Latin handwriting, which I hear is now true in the USA, as well. I’ve found ...

Burning questions about teaching English in China #3: You konw wat?

Burning questions about teaching English in China #3: You konw wat?
The idea for these articles came to me during this past winter holiday, as I was reflecting on beginning my tenth year teaching English in China. In that time, I’ve noticed many common mistakes made by English learners and wondered why they were so common, yet so easily corrected. In other words, I wondered how it was possible for so many university students to have acquired the same bad habits, regardless of where they went to school or what their major was. So, I decided to write a series of (mostly) short articles highlighted each of these puzzling errors, in the hope that students – and their teachers – can somehow explain why they occur and how best to stop students from making these mistakes in the future. I will post them in my Qzone, on Steemit.com, and on my blog. Readers who are not familiar with English education in China need to understand that all university students have had English as a Foreign Language (EFL) instruction since middle school, and many from grade 3 in primary school. Additionally, all university majors need to take two years of English instruction and pass two national English-proficiency exams. Despite all these years ...

Burning questions about teaching English in China #2: Ture or false?

Burning questions about teaching English in China #2: Ture or false?
The idea for these articles came to me during this past winter holiday, as I was reflecting on beginning my tenth year teaching English in China. In that time, I’ve noticed many common mistakes made by English learners and wondered why they were so common, yet so easily corrected. In other words, I wondered how it was possible for so many university students to have acquired the same bad habits, regardless of where they went to school or what their major was. So, I decided to write a series of (mostly) short articles highlighted each of these puzzling errors, in the hope that students – and their teachers – can somehow explain why they occur and how best to stop students from making these mistakes in the future. I will post them in my Qzone, on Steemit.com, and on my blog. Readers who are not familiar with English education in China need to understand that all university students have had English as a Foreign Language (EFL) instruction since middle school, and many from grade 3 in primary school. Additionally, all university majors need to take two years of English instruction and pass two national English-proficiency exams. Despite all these years ...

Burning questions about teaching English in China #1: He said, she said

Burning questions about teaching English in China #1: He said, she said
The idea for these articles came to me during this past winter holiday, as I was reflecting on beginning my tenth year teaching English in China. In that time, I’ve noticed many common mistakes made by English learners and wondered why they were so common, yet so easily corrected. In other words, I wondered how it was possible for so many university students to have acquired the same bad habits, regardless of where they went to school or what their major was. So, I decided to write a series of (mostly) short articles highlighted each of these puzzling errors, in the hope that students – and their teachers – can somehow explain why they occur and how best to stop students from making these mistakes in the future. I will post them in my Qzone, on Steemit.com, and on my blog. Readers who are not familiar with English education in China need to understand that all university students have had English as a Foreign Language (EFL) instruction since middle school, and many from grade 3 in primary school. Additionally, all university majors need to take two years of English instruction and pass two national English-proficiency exams. Despite all these years ...

Chinese journalist’s on-camera eye roll lands her in hot water

Chinese journalist's on-camera eye roll lands her in hot water
ZHENGZHOU, HENAN — Honest displays of exasperation can sometimes get you in trouble in China. During an arranged Q&A session with a government official attending the national party congress meeting, a US-based reporter (at right with the mic) launched into a long-winded introduction to her softball question. Another reporter, Liang Xiangyi of China Business News, at first looks amused, then exasperated, and finally rolls her eyes toward the sky and looks away. Her honest reaction to an obvious suck-up question quickly went viral on Chinese social media, with many commenters praising her for expressing what they felt. Memes like the one below were also swiftly circulated. Then the censors jumped in and cleaned all such commentary off the ‘Net. Liang has reportedly lost her press credentials to cover the National People’s Congress now being held in Beijing. Meanwhile, netizens in the USA are questioning whether American Multimedia Television USA, the media outlet represented by the long-winded reporter, Zhang Huijun, might be connected to the Chinese Communist Party in some way. Here’s a translation of Zhang’s query. You can see Liang’s reaction to it in this YouTube clip. Similar clips have been removed from China’s video-sharing sites.

Onward to Da Nang, but not by train

Onward to Da Nang, but not by train
[Classes began last week, so please accept my apologies for delaying this post.] HANOI, VIETNAM — Now that I had settled on visiting Da Nang, in hopes of finding some warmer weather and an ocean view, the question was how to get there. My first plan was to take the overnight train from Hanoi to Da Nang. With that in mind, I figured lodging at the Mango Hotel (above), which is right next to the Hanoi train station, made sense. It was only about $22 a night and offered free breakfast, and I could walk to it from my Airbnb. Once at the hotel (which is not bad, by the way), I set about finding out how to buy train tickets for a departure two days later. The cost ranged from $40 for a soft seat to $60 for a soft sleeper berth, and the trip would take about 15 to 16 hours. On a lark, I also checked airfares from Hanoi to Da Nang. It was cheaper to fly! Only $36 for a round-trip ticket to Da Nang. So guess what I did. My lodging in Da Nang was another Airbnb within walking distance to My Khe beach. For ...

Some sightseeing in Hanoi — Hoan Kiem Lake 1

Some sightseeing in Hanoi -- Hoan Kiem Lake
HANOI — My days in Hanoi were fairly low key. For one thing, the weather was less than ideal: damp and chilly but for one day. And for two days, I was zoned out with a bad headcold, which required me to work double-time to meet an editing deadline. But once that job was complete, I wanted to do at least one or two touristy things, given that I was smack in the middle of one of Hanoi’s historical districts. The Old Quarter has a history going back several hundred years or more. I took two self-guided walking tours. The first was to West Lake (Hồ Tây), but before I reached it, I spent most of the afternoon in the Vietnam Military History Museum, which was on the way. I’ve already posted a few photos from the museum here. The second was to a smaller lake, Hoàn Kiếm, home to a Confucian temple and surrounded by many restaurants, hotels and shops. The day I visited West Lake was rather dreary, and I have few attractive photos of the area. In fact, having spent most of the afternoon at the museum, I really only got as far as Trúc Bạch Lake, ...
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