Blast from the past: the International Baccalaureate ‘conspiracy’ 34

JISHOU, HUNAN — So, three years ago, I wrote a post about objections to the International Baccalaureate program as a tool of the left wing, socialists, the UN, anti-Christians and things that go bump in the night.

It got a few comments afterward, but they petered out in early 2008. Then “ObserverNY,” otherwise known as Lisa McLoughlin, dropped by late last month and reopened the discussion. You can read our previous exchanges at the original post. The purpose of this post is to highlight her most recent comment, and my response to it.

To put it briefly, Lisa does not trust the UN or President Barack Obama, and predicts a “revolution” is coming. The IB program is just the tip of the iceberg of her fears and objections to the world as it is.

Her post begins with a response to my questioning whether IB is an NGO of the UN.

eljefe –

I’m afraid you are incorrect. IBO is PRECISELY an NGO of UNESCO. Since you don’t want to look at my website, how about the official IB website? Is that ok with you?

http://www.ibo.org/partnerships/governments/

UNESCO
The IB has been recognized as a NGO of UNESCO since 1970 and currently has the status of “formal consultative relations as a network” with UNESCO. IB representatives participate regularly in UNESCO meetings and comment on UNESCO proposals in education. Some projects have received UNESCO funding—see Cambodia and Nigeria in the list of partnerships [126 kb, PDF] and exchanges with governments and inter-governmental organizations (IGOs).

Back in the early 70’s when I was in HS, I was a hippie. We protested the Vietnam War, our school had constant drug raids, we wore scraggly ripped jeans, we all had long hair and I even cleaned up an oil spill with the Environmental Action Club. You might even be interested in knowing I taught the lead guitarist for Sonic Youth how to play Blackbird, Lee and I are friends. We went to Grateful Dead concerts in old VW mini-vans and did all kinds of groovy things. Our school was on split-session due to the recession of the 70’s and I had to catch the bus at 6:15 AM. In my senior year, I doubled up on my courses simply so I could graduate in January. I couldn’t WAIT to get out of there.

And then I grew up.

You ask me: what is wrong with the UN? What exactly are you afraid of?

As far as I’m concerned, the UN should fall into the East River and suffer the same fate as The League of Nations. It is a destructive, corrupt, dysfunctional, power-hungry organization that seeks to rule the world. Our idiot President just yesterday, joined the UNHRC. If ANY division of the UN is a bigger farce and more full of communist hypocrites, I can’t really think of it. UNESCO is a close second. Reagan pulled the U.S. out of UNESCO and it was only idiot Bush the 2nd who rejoined after the adoption of Goals 2000. Tax cheat TurboTax Geithner and the Obamination are now meeting with the G20 and the concept of a “global currency” is “on the table”. And you ask me what I am afraid of?

I am afraid that this naive President who thinks we can sit down and “talk” to crazed dictators like Chavez and Achmadinejad is shredding our Constitution. I’m afraid that this President who duped the American public into believing his message of “hope” and “change” is changing this country into what can only be described as “democratic fascism”. I’m afraid that all of our individual freedoms are being stripped from us in a far more dangerous manner than the Patriot Act ever did. And I’m afraid for my children and my grandchildren as to what kind of America they will have to live in and be mercilessly taxed in if we don’t stand up for the Constitution and American fundamentals.

Remember, 48% of this country DID NOT vote for Obama. I am afraid a revolution is coming. I’m just a suburban Mom, yet for the first time in my life I have purchased a gun. I now go to the range regularly to hone my skills. The cost of ammunition has gone up 250% since the election. I am not alone. On April 15th, you will see an outpouring of protest across this country the likes of which has never been seen before. There will be protests by Americans, and at these protests there will be Democrats, Republicans, Libertarians and probably some anarchists, but the bottom line is they will be Americans standing up for American principles and saying, Enough is enough!

Infiltration of the UN/One World government’s agenda through our children’s education is the most heinous of all. I’ll leave you with the words of a very famous German you may have heard of: He alone, who owns the youth, gains the Future!

OK, OK. So, the IB is an NGO of the UN. I concede the point, but I still doubt that the UN, or UNESCO, or any external agency micromanages the IBO. Then again, I don’t swallow most conspiracy theories hook, line and sinker.

From your autobiographical details, I can tell we are approximately the same age (I graduated Cold Spring Harbor HS in 1974, so we are also fellow Long Islanders), but there the resemblance ends. I was a liberal in HS, though not a hippie, despite my long hair then. [Hippies kind of fell off the map around 1971 or so, anyway. So did the word “groovy,” as I recall. Not all hippies were Deadheads, and vice versa, either.] If you have recounted your wind and crazy HS experiences in an effort to establish street creds as a recovered liberal, I am afraid you have failed to impress me.

I could really care less about your connections to Sonic Youth and Lee Ranaldo, either. It may interest you to know I attended the same schools — from kindergarten to university — as former eBay CEO Margaret Whitman. We were not friends then, or now. So what? Connections to famous people do not mean a damn thing.

You grew up. Congratulations. I suppose you mean to imply that I did not, since I am still a liberal, pacifistic, environmentally conscious baby boomer, with the emphasis on “baby.” If your version of adulthood is the model of being “grown up,” then I am glad I missed that train. You sound like you’re still afraid of the bogeyman, except now, he’s the UN.

Points conceded: the UN is a bureaucratic nightmare, top-heavy with administrators, and saddled with dealing with more than 190 contentious, independent nations all trying to get a piece of the same pie. “Power-hungry?” “Seeks to rule the world?” The UN is so inefficient I doubt it could manage to rule Manhattan Island successfully, even if the Mayor and millions of New Yorkers rolled over and let it.

“A global currency”
There already is one, a de facto one. It is called the US dollar. Before that, it was the pound sterling. Neither led to worldwide hegemony, though the UK did control most of the Third World for a while. The EU has the euro as a common currency. So far, those countries have not yet merged into a monolithic European Nation.

“Obama and ‘democratic fascism'”
Fascism is never democratic, no matter how fascist states choose to name themselves. Obama has not shredded the Constitution, and I would ask you to specify exactly what he has done to do so. His predecessor walked all over separation of powers for eight years, and pushed the PATRIOT Act — a serious infringement on individual freedoms — through Congress, yet somehow you (and every rightwing talk radio host) never seemed to squawk about it then.

And in case you have not noticed, the USA is still a two-party government, and the GOP seems to be doing a pretty decent job fighting Obama’s so-called liberal reforms, much better than the Dems did fighting the Bush Administration’s conservative reforms. So, running around like Chicken Little telling us the sky is falling makes you sound exactly like the nutjobs you say you are not.

“Remember, 48% of this country DID NOT vote for Obama. I am afraid a revolution is coming. I’m just a suburban Mom, yet for the first time in my life I have purchased a gun. I now go to the range regularly to hone my skills.”

Again, so what? Half the country did not vote for Bush last election, but we are still a United States of America. We liberals did not suggest secession or revolution. (Of course, we are all “babies” who don’t pack heat, so such an effort would be doomed from the start.) Are you suggesting that every time we elect the “wrong” president, the citizenry should take up arms and revolt? You would rather the USA emulate some Latin American countries of yore, with an annual revolution or two whenever one faction found fault with the most recent election/coup d’etat? That idea seems pretty “un-American.” If we as a country had adopted that fatalistic frame of mind, the USA would have fallen apart long before the Civil War.

“Crazed dictators”
Chavez is full of hot air, a Castro-wannabe. Ahmadinejad’s government is a little more dangerous, I grant, but Iran is not the next Soviet Union. The USA has been dealing with “crazed dictators” throughout its history. Sometimes our choices have been pretty poor. Sometimes they are excellent. You may recall, being of the same vintage as I, that at one time the USA did not recognize “Red China” as a legitimate nation. That ended when that liberal firebrand Nixon (that’s sarcasm, by the way) ended that policy by visiting China in the ’70s. Smart move, if you ask me; without China buying up $1 trillion in US Treasury Bonds and Bills, we’d be in a bigger economic mess than we are now.

A tax revolt on April 15 — is that what you suggest will happen? The “people” will take to the streets and show Washington and the IRS what-for? I am not holding my breath. Sure, we all hate paying taxes, but we would be paying taxes for a long long time with or without Obama’s recovery plan. (Carrying two wars in two separate nations is a tad expensive, you know.) Others (from the nuttier elements of the right wing, many of whom seem to live in remote compounds in Idaho) have been predicting these tax revolts for decades, in fact every time a Democrat gets elected to office and raises taxes. None have come to pass, kind of like that Y2K meltdown and the Second Coming at the millennium.

Nice touch, ending with a quote from Adolf Hitler, from 1935. By this I suppose you are trying to equate the IB program with the Hitler Youth. Before you start making such accusations, you might want to read up on your history. Hitler was a fascist, a real one. The Nazis imposed the Hitler Youth on the Germany public, requiring all boys (well, the Aryan ones) to serve in the Youth to be indoctrinated in the “Nazi way.” It was not an educational program, or a school; it was a propaganda wing of the ruling party. To suggest the IB program has a similar aim — or result — is so ludicrous that it defies logic.

Lisa, you want me to respect you as someone different from a “religious nutjob conspiracy theorist.” This last diatribe from you is so frankly wacko that you have sealed your fate. I cannot take you seriously. Arguing with you about the merits of IB is a patent waste of time, and I have other things to do.

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34 thoughts on “Blast from the past: the International Baccalaureate ‘conspiracy’

  1. Reply ObserverNY Apr 7,2009 8:31 am

    The Recovered Liberal

    That I am Eljefe, that I am.

    OK, OK. So, the IB is an NGO of the UN. I concede the point, but I still doubt that the UN, or UNESCO, or any external agency micromanages the IBO. Then again, I don’t swallow most conspiracy theories hook, line and sinker.

    I’m glad that you manned-up and conceded the point. I’d find it rather silly, especially as a physics/ESL teacher, if you continued to ignore facts. I think one might call someone who does that … a conspiracy theorist! However, I would prefer to put the name-calling aside. Except for Recovered Liberal. I like that one. Debate the facts.

    Why can’t the International Baccalaureate Organization, which claims to hold the key to teaching children to “know how to know”, have the basic intellectual honesty to state its UNESCO relationship in its sales-pitches? Not only does IBO fail to mention its “birth-parents” to potential customers, it goes out of its way to deny any affiliation! It’s like the UN is IBO’s “funny UNcle” that no one wants to talk about. “Kofi who? Oh no, HE’S not related to US!”

    Let’s take a look at a recent resolution adopted by the U.N just this past November:
    http://www.unwatch.org/atf/cf/%7B6DEB65DA-BE5B-4CAE-8056-8BF0BEDF4D17%7D/DEFAMATION2008UNGA.PDF
    It passed by a vote of 86 to 53, with 42 abstentions. That almost sounds like it could be a vote out of our U.S. Senate. Hardly what I would call bi-partisanship. Most important is HOW nations voted on this resolution. I’m not going to do your homework for you. You are clearly a very clever, but rather misguided man, and I am not going to sink to your political and emotional level by lobbing ad hominems back your way. There is simply no point (other than to release some pent up inner aggressions I may have, and I have learned that is never productive).

    Arguing with you about the merits of IB is a patent waste of time

    Especially when you were unable to find a single IB merit to argue in favor of! Your entire “argument” consisted of personal attack, defensiveness and political rhetoric. I did not see a single reference to anything religious in my post which you replicated, and yet you persist in “sealing my fate” as a “religious nutjob conspiracy theorist”. You may, as blogmaster, “seal my fate” in your little bandwidth in cyberspace, but your authority to be judge and jury as to my fate extends no Higher.

    Your blatant incongruity and inability to argue a single positive in defense of your beloved IB program(me) must lead those who are reading this exchange to take pause. I wasn’t trying to impress you, frankly I don’t give a darn what you think of me, I gave you a little personal history to try and keep the tone friendly. Obviously that was a waste of time. You and I are of the same HS graduating classes, right next door to each other. I used to have dinner with my parents all the time at The Mooring until it burned down. Our “hamlets” both have Billy Joel in common. He lives down the road from me now on Centre Island. Not name-dropping, just stating a fact. I stayed. You left. My perspective is that of an American, home-owning, taxpaying parent, who sees IB as a superfluous educational program with indigestible costs attached to a disingenuous ideology.

    It just so happens I watched a special on the History Channel the other night about Hitler. Especially fascinating were the lengths Hitler undertook to destroy any evidence of his partial Jewish ancestry. He wiped the town off the map.

    History repeats itself. Those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it. Fool me once, shame on me. Fool me twice, shame on you. I could go on, but I’ll spare you. If you want me to respect you in a “scholarly” manner (yes, those are fear quotes), and you wish to continue the debate, may I recommend that you stick to a defense of the non-political aspects of the IB program(me) such as cost, lack of college credit, lack of transparency, inferior university/UCAS recognition vs. AP/A-Levels, etc. 😉

  2. Reply NH Apr 7,2009 3:26 pm

    Why then are teachers asked to sign a mission statement that commits them to the UN goals of MDG, UDHR, etc etc etc????

    Face it, the push is on to make kids ‘global citizens’ and Obama just subjugated the whole American financial system to his elitist banker friends in foreign countries. They want sympathy for global warming and a UN tax.

    He should be hung from the nearest tree for treason!

    And IB and the UN should be kicked out of our American schools.

    We shed blood for freedom in the 1700’s and now we are being re-absorbed by the elitist bankers again.

    I think you need to read this article from someone in Bedford NH who knows the score:

    http://www.cabinet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/NS/20090320/BEDFORD05/303209984/-1/bedford05

  3. Reply eljefe Apr 8,2009 5:37 am

    ObserverNY —

    I had more time to research this UN NGO thing. I still remain unconvinced that the UN or UNESCO has any role in the daily operations of the IBO, which you and other anti-IB folks continue to infer on a multiplicity of websites. There is nothing in the governance structure of the IBO that even remotely suggests UN or UNESCO has any representation on the IBO board or staff. Likewise, there is nothing in the UNESCO directives relating to NGOs that suggests UNESCO has any direct influence on the NGOs. In fact, the NGOs mostly serve as advisors to UNESCO. So, harping on IB’s “connection” to the UN is mostly just blowing hot air.

    I was also curious to see what other radical leftist, one-worlder organizations are also UNESCO NGOs. They include B’Nai B’Rith, Dyslexia International, Pax Christi, Pax Romana and Rotary International. Several others hold the same distinction as the IBO: formal consultative relations as a network (whatever that bureaucratese means). They include the Club of Rome, the Committee to Protect Journalists, the European Academy of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, the International Ocean Institute and the Simon Weisenthal Center.

    So, the IBO is just one among many NGOs associated with UNESCO. Do you distrust only the IBO? Or does your suspicion also extend to Rotary International and the Simon Weisenthal Center, too? If IBO is guilty by association with the UN, then by that logic all UN NGOs must similarly be suspect.

    To be absolutely clear, I conceded only that the IBO is an NGO of the UN. I do not agree with you that the UN has any influence or control over the IBO. Don’t misquote me.

    You want the IBO to “fess up” to its UN connections. But you yourself gave me a link on the IBO’s own website that states it is an NGO of UNESCO. It’s not hiding anything. Furthermore, UNESCO and the UN are not its “birth parents,” as the IBO history makes clear. The IBO advises UNESCO, not the other way around. You basically want the IBO to admit to something that that you allege with no solid evidence to support your accusations. Insinuations are not evidence, no matter how often you repeat them.

    As for the remark about your being a “religious nutjob conspiracy theorist,” you used those very same words in one of your earlier comments. While you have not expressly mentioned any religious affiliations or beliefs, you deliberately capitalized the words “Truth” and “Higher,” which leads me to suspect you have some firm religious beliefs. If you are sensitive about being seen as a “nutjob conspiracy theorist,” then don’t act like one. I have found the same accusations and insinuations on your site on scores of right-wing websites that just repeat the same drivel without bothering to check if their facts are accurate.

    Or, I can drop the label altogether, since it serves no real purpose anyway.

    You want me to defend my “beloved IB program(me)” when in fact I don’t “love” it. Nowhere have I said the IB program is the best educational program in the world. In fact, I said earlier that the IB is not suitable for all school districts or all students. Neither is the AP program. Or Montessori. Or Waldorf. Or a slew of other educational methods and structures.

    That said, IB is a successful program. Its graduates do in fact go to college, worldwide. They in fact get a good liberal arts education, worldwide. If IB was really “junk,” then schools and parents would have dumped it ages ago. No one can fool that many people for 40 years. Its success advertises its merits far better than I can.

    But if you insist, I will investigate the non-political aspects of the IB program. Keep in mind, however, that I do have a job, and no matter what you believe, I am not that passionate about IB to spend hours researching its ROI, college admission success rate, and so on.

    “I stayed. You left.”
    Now who is making personal attacks? What is your point? You stayed on the Island, while I left to work elsewhere in the USA, or you stayed in the USA, while I left to teach in China? It should make no difference where I live. Besides, I wrote the original IB post three years ago, when I was paying property taxes and still living in the US.

    You watched a History Channel program on Hitler. Nice. To flesh out your knowledge of that era, read The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich. It might be a tad more informative.

    And again, you are insinuating that we have a modern-day Hitler or Nazi movement on the horizon. If you want me to drop “political rhetoric” from my argument, then please do so as well.

    ****
    As for the website you mentioned in your other comment, its author is trying to do what some Christians try to do: find science in a religious text. It can’t be done. It might be a useful intellectual exercise for a believer, but it means nothing to a scientist or science in general.

  4. Reply eljefe Apr 8,2009 5:49 am

    NH —
    Do you mean this missions statement:

    The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

    To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

    These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

    I taught at an independent school. We also had a mission statement. We as the faculty had to sign off on it. So what?

    “Obama just subjugated the whole American financial system to his elitist banker friends …”
    I thought it was quite the other way around, at least here in the US. It’s the banks that are beholden to the American financial system right now.

    Besides, we live in a world economy now. Practically every nation on the planet holds financial instruments backed by the US dollar. Hundreds if not thousands of foreign companies have factories and offices in the USA. If the US financial system collapses, it will take everyone in the planet down the toilet with it, including China.

    Your invective makes even less sense than ObserverNY’s arguments. So, unless you can make a clear case for or against the IB program, stay out of the discussion.

  5. Reply eljefe Apr 8,2009 12:17 pm

    It’s late here, and I cannot wade through all of ObserverNY’s really long comment now. Or even begin to address how Rotary International could possible be considered left-wing extremist. But NH, I have a question for you: do you still have the text of that mission statement, or the contract you say you had to sign? Were you working for an IB school, or an district adopting the IB program?

    And, I did not tell you to shut up, NH. I want you to stay on the topic, and not go off on an anti-Obama, anti-“global elitist banker” tangent. I’m being a moderator, which as the owner of this blog is my right. Besides, ObserverNY wants me to address the educational value and success (or failure) of IB, and stay away from the political aspects. Maybe you can, too.

    Both of you have been very busy commenting here, so I need to inform you that I manually approve all comments before they are published. I had a real problem with spam a while back, so I have my spam control system set up that way. This means your comments will not always appear promptly, if I happen to be doing other things. So, don’t get all paranoid on me and accuse me of censoring or banning you if your comments don’t appear immediately.

  6. Reply ObserverNY Apr 8,2009 9:27 am

    eljefe,

    Or does your suspicion also extend to Rotary International and the Simon Weisenthal Center, too?

    I’m a fairly consistent individual. If a substantial link (such as being an NGO of the UN) exists between one organization and another, then yes, I’m willing to go on record as suspecting the Simon Weisenthal Center or others of being simpatico with a One World Government. I’ll go a step further and add Goldman Sachs, a regularly listed contributor to IBO. Did you watch the news this morning?

    I did fund-raising for the American Red Cross. I would not fund-raise for the International Red Cross. While I find it odd that you do not consider the UNESCO/IBO “peace education” agreement sufficient evidence of integration of the ideology into “every aspect” of IB curriculum, you specifically state:

    There is nothing in the governance structure of the IBO that even remotely suggests UN or UNESCO has any representation on the IBO board or staff.

    It seems to me that unless IBO lists UNESCO as a Board member’s country of origin, you are resistant to accepting the fact that as an NGO of the UN, every single one of the Board members are representing UN “ideals” in IB governance. UNESCO, Paris, is listed in the 2007 IB Annual Review as a Contributor, UNESCO, Hanoi, in previous years. I found it interesting that just yesterday, UNIS.org AND ibo.org visited my site. If you have analytics on this site you might want to see if they are keeping tabs on you, too. You want to dispute my “birth parent” analogy? Please read IB Deputy DG Ian Hill’s paper presented to UNESCO in 2005:

    http://www.unidir.org/pdf/articles/pdf-art53.pdf

    Btw, you still have time to get a ticket to this year’s IB Peterson Lecture:

    http://www.ibo.org/announcements/annualgeneralmeeting.cfm – Ms Carol Bellamy, former Executive Director of UNICEF (1995-2005) and currently President and CEO of World Learning, will be delivering this lecture. – Thursday 23 April 2009 The title of Ms Bellamyâ��s lecture is â��The serious business of children.â��

    I doubt she does the lecture for free. Which means IB hired her to be the featured speaker at their most “prestigious” lecture. And I just LOVE the title of her lecture. Kinda says it all, doesn’t it?

    In fact, I said earlier that the IB is not suitable for all school districts or all students.

    You did? Let me look. Well, I apologize, here it is:

    IB is not suitable for every student, or for every school district. If a local community rejects IB, no big deal, but such decisions should be made rationally, on the basis of the educational value of the program.

    Very good. We agree. Allow me to point out the problem however, with what appears to be the very innocuous wording of this statement. First of all, a local community does not have the power or the opportunity to reject IB before it infiltrates its system. In fact, I filed an Appeal with the Commissioner of Education of NYS to try and obtain such authority for the voters of LVCSD. I wanted the district to run a proposition on the ballot as separate program approval item, like they do for Drivers Ed. My Appeal was denied, the Comm ruled that when it comes to decisions concerning curriculum, the BoE is autonomous. http://www.counsel.nysed.gov/Decisions/volume44/d15191.htm

    District Superintendents want to put a “designer label” on their districts which will make them “stand out” from other, often better performing, districts, hence IB. BoE’s are notorious for rubber stamping whatever a Superintendent recommends, in fact, they go for formal training to do exactly that. An item is almost NEVER brought to a vote unless a recommendation has been agreed to by a majority of the Board in executive session first. Initial costly “exploration” of IB by district staff is funded out of the bloated “staff development” line in budgets. Out in California, just last week, a group of concerned parents met with the MS Principal who is trying to foist IB on the school. He explained how they visited an IB school in Colorado. “Colorado? Why the hell didn’t you visit a local IB school?” one of my informed parents asked.(California happens to have the largest number of IB schools in the country) The Principal responded, “Which schools and where are they?” Uh oh. This did NOT sit well with the parents. “You mean you don’t KNOW?” was the collective response from the parents. The Principal then giggled. That’s right. Giggled. One Dad stood up and said, “What the hell are you laughing at?” He said you could have heard a pin drop in the room. I’m sad to say, this is all too typical of IB presentations by administrators to the public. Wasteful spending and vague information, couched in PC feel good phraseology. I liken IB promoters to snake-oil salesmen. I’m not an easy sell on anything, especially something that is going to raise my taxes and impact the education of children. IB’s marketing methods have a distinct odor to them, and it isn’t pleasant.

    Which brings us to “educational value”. Value and values. The cost of the IB program does not support the claimed value by sellers of the programme. Its courses receive less college credit. Its exams are not norm-referenced. The credentials of IB examiners are questionable. The claims of admission to prestigious universities mean nothing, those very same students most likely would have been in the top 10 of their class with or without IB and would have been admitted to those schools anyway with AP. The educational values of the IB program incorporate globalist values which IB claims are universal. I, and many others, reject that claim.

    �I stayed. You left.�Now who is making personal attacks? What is your point? You stayed on the Island, while I left to work elsewhere in the USA, or you stayed in the USA, while I left to teach in China? It should make no difference where I live. Besides, I wrote the original IB post three years ago, when I was paying property taxes and still living in the US.

    I didn’t mean that as a personal attack. It was a statement of fact and frame of reference or perspective. Three years ago, our country wasn’t on the verge of bankruptcy. Three years ago, my house was worth $200,000 more than it is worth today. Three years ago, my school taxes were 18% LESS than they are today. Three years ago, our health insurance was paid for, now we have to pay the entire premium ourselves. We count our blessings that we still have jobs. Three years ago I wasn’t terrified that my children would live in a country that had abandoned American fundamentals and values. Perhaps in China you are not feeling the same economic devastation we are feeling here. You chose to move to communist China. As an American, you had that choice. As a Chinese national, you would not have had the same option. And now, during Holy Week, we have a President pandering to Muslims that “America is not a Christian nation or a Jewish nation or a Muslim nation, but a nation of citizens”. Before you launch into a speech about separation of church and state and how education is supposed to be secular, I agree. However, to mis-characterize the overall make-up of our country is wrong. Remember when you were a kid and used to look up countries in the encyclopedia? Remember how it listed in a country’s stats the predominant religion(s) practiced in that country? Please refer back to the Aga Khan’s IB Petersen Lecture. It’s okay for IB to preach “tolerance” for Islam, but not Christianity or Judaism? IB is the UN’s arm to allow Islam to undermine America’s Judeo-Christian origins and citizen majority. I’ll go a step further and refer to MSN Encarta’s unbelievable left-wing, anti-Christian reference to religion in America today which apparently is what Obama is referring to:

    Because the United States is a secular society founded on the separation of church and state, many of the most meaningful religiously based festivals and rituals, such as Easter, Rosh Hashanah, and Ramadan, are not enshrined as national events, with one major exception. Christmas, and the holiday season surrounding it, is an enormous commercial enterprise, a fixture of the American social calendar, and deeply embedded in the popular imagination….Thus, the Christmas season has become the closest thing to a true national festival in the United States….The expansion of Christmas has even begun to encroach on the most indigenous of American festivals, Thanksgiving. Celebrated on the last Thursday in November, Thanksgiving has largely shed its original religious meaning (as a feast of giving thanks to God) to become a celebration of the bounty of food and the warmth of family life in America.

    In fact, the sub-category RELIGION doesn’t even appear in Encarta’s Culture of the United States section. Unbelievable. But wait, what does Encarta say about France?

    RELIGION – Roman Catholicism is the dominant religion in France. More than 80 percent of the French population officially identifies with this faith, although only a minority claim to be practicing Catholics. Smaller minorities follow Islam, Protestantism, and Judaism.

    Frankly, I just stunned myself by reading this description in Encarta. Nope, can’t list Religion when it comes to the U.S., it’s “Celebrations and Holidays”. It is rare that I am speechless. Obviously the U.S. is diverse, but to misrepresent the reality of our country’s founding principles and current composition while accurately describing religious composition in France, is frankly, beyond the pale. News flash to Encarta –

    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal,that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. â�� That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, â�� That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it…

    Please note: the word ‘Right’ is capitalized.

    I disagree if the US financial system collapses that it will take China down with it. China holds Trillions in U.S. debt and U.S. deeds. And “very, very, angry letters” from the UN are not going to stop nuclear proliferation in N. Korea, China and Iran. We, as an American nation, need to be strong and unified in terms of our core values and national defense, not dismantle and dismiss them. Rather than put more troops in Afghanistan and PAHKistan, I would prefer to see our country build that missile defense system in Alaska, secure our borders, our air and sea space, and let Pakistan and Afghanistan blow themselves up. But that’s another post, another time.

  7. Reply NH Apr 8,2009 10:53 am

    The CLUB OF ROME? H-O-L-Y C-O-W !!!!

    Thank you for doing that bit of research for me, but why am I surprised?

    ObserverNY, can you believe it?

    That is one of the oldest and most definitive groups of elitists who seek to run the world that you could EVER name!

    That sums it up right there! Talk about bad influence on the kids!!!!

    And yes I am SUSPICIOUS of the Committee to Protect Journalists, the European Academy of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, (same as the USA division) the International Ocean Institute and the Simon Weisenthal Center, B’Nai B’Rith, Dyslexia International, Pax Christi, Pax Romana and Rotary International. These are all left-wing extremist groups.

    Any group of global socialists, driven by elitist groups like Club of Rome, one of the MOST highly suspect groups behind the ‘new world order, one world government’ is just setting out a perfect example of what we are talking about.

    CASE CLOSED. IB is a trojan horse for the world’s global elitists who want a one-world government (and who might now just get that with this total puppet laughing clown in the US presidency) .

    Typical of you to tell me to shut up. I am sure most people were not asked to sign a statement pledging to a FORM OF GOVERNMENT.
    And yes, that is what is wrong — our money system should not be under the rule of private banker elitists from the Club of Rome who are not accountable to the PEOPLE.

    Shameful!

  8. Reply NH Apr 8,2009 10:55 am

    PS – No it was not THAT watered down mission statement. Read again what I said. Mine clearly stated on my contract that I was to

    “….pledge to teach the mission of WORLD GOVERNMENT”.

    It did not even say world citizenship, which is a euphemism for the same thing, intended to be less alarming.

    And, this was before anyone heard of IB. It came down with Goals 2000 likely to satisfy some other illegal treaty the UN imposed on us.

  9. Reply NH Apr 8,2009 12:25 pm

    To answer your question, it was in the mid-90s that this happened and the teachers were so upset when I told them what it meant, that the union actually stuck up for us and said we did not have to sign it. I wish I’d kept it, it was a one sheet of paper thing when we lost tenure that was supposedly lifetime.

    I did recently offer a $500 reward for anyone who still had the paper. I might still have it tucked away in a bag from school days, and someday when I clean I will find it.

    I have nothing else to say except that aside from the extra money that this program costs and the doubt that it provides anything better than an AP program, I do very much object to the political aspect of it insofar as its own stated agenda. And from what I have seen they make no bones about what that political agenda is.

    It is admitted that the purpose of ‘school’ is to make the students into global citizens and social activists and I’m not sure all parents would like this if they knew. Most of my friends who still have young children home school for this reason. I am not religious but I do object to thousands and thousands of my tax dollars going to support a political agenda in the schools.

    I’m done.

  10. Reply ObserverNY Apr 8,2009 12:36 pm

    eljefe,

    The most disturbing thing is that politics, economics and education are intrinsically entwined. Another news flash here in the U.S. – Bill Gates was just awarded 11M out of our stimulus package – http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/03/31/bridge.microsoft/
    This would explain MSN Encarta’s pantheistic description of religion in American culture.

    Take a look at this out of Minnesota:
    http://deltondigest.blogspot.com/2009/04/432-billion-in-savings-seen-in.html
    • Eliminate International Baccalaureate Program – IB is a needless duplication of services offered by the more effective, efficient and locally controlled Advanced Placement and Concurrent Enrollment programs. $2,250,000

    And to that I say, amen.

    Now I’m off to break the news to a friend about to go through a divorce that the house I sold her three years ago for 1.7M and which she put $600K in improvements into, is probably only worth about 1.8M. Oh, I COULD tell her it’s absolutely worth at LEAST $2.3M and that there are tons of buyers clamoring to get their hands on her house, but that wouldn’t be very honest, now would it?

  11. Reply eljefe Apr 10,2009 11:21 am

    ObserverNY —

    You want me to stick to IB’s costs and educational value, yet you come out with howlers like, “IB is UN’s arm to allow Islam to undermine America’s Judeo-Christian origins and citizen majority.” Statements like that are hard to ignore. What evidence, other than insinuations and alleged associations, is there to support such an accusation? And are you making the common error of equating radical Islam (the Osama bin Ladens) with Islam in general? There are plenty of Muslim Americans who are as patriotic as Christians, Jews, or atheists, and would hardly want to undermine the very system that grants them freedom of worship. Besides, Islam has Judeo-Christian origins as well.

    It is very true that the Declaration of Independence specifically mentions the Creator. But the Declaration is not the legal document on which the entire American legal and political system rests. That Constitution serves as that foundation, and nowhere in that document are any mentions of God-given rights. As for Encarta, it is just one of many encyclopedias, and one that I (as an educator) do not advise students to use as their sole source of information. If it states that the USA is a secular nation, it may perhaps mean that the USA, unlike France, does not have a “state religion,” that is, a religion officially recognized by the government as the “official religion” of the country. Obviously, there are religious people in the US, and in France there are non-Catholics. (There was a time, of course, when being a non-Catholic in France or a Catholic in England would have been bad for your health.)

    I refuse to get sucked into a debate about whether the USA is a “Christian nation” or not, or to gauge how accurate Obama’s appraisal of the role of religion in the US is. Obama said nothing new, actually; many other presidents, going back to the 18th century, have said similar things to foreign leaders. Remember, Obama is a politician, trying to curry overseas favor.

    Now, to the real matter at hand, from which you and NH continue to digress despite telling me not to … the “value” of IB. I am trying to get some recent concrete information from IB schools of my acquaintance in the States. Since I easily cannot pick up the phone and call, I am relying on emails. So responses are trickling in. I figure using data from the IBO website will not impress you, since you also have access to it. So if we can all hold off on the rhetoric while I do my research, I’d appreciate it.

    “The claims of admission to prestigious universities mean nothing, those very same students most likely would have been in the top 10 of their class with or without IB and would have been admitted to those schools anyway with AP.”

    By this argument, no school need offer either AP or IB, since the top 10% of any class would be admitted to top universities anyway. The truth is, the top universities use AP/IB/G&T/advanced/honors courses in considering applications. A student in the top 10% may have terrific board scores and a 4.0 GPA, but if the courses are all bunnies, that kid hasn’t a chance of being admitted. (With the possible exceptions of athletes and legacies). Highly selective schools look for kids who have taken challenging courses, and done well in them. You and NH may believe IB a waste of time and money, but plenty of universities worldwide — including our own service academies — seem to believe otherwise.

    College admissions is such a crapshoot in many ways that making blanket statements about AP and IB is pretty useless. I used to do alumni admissions work for my university, but eventually gave it up. The requirements to get into an Ivy now are so lofty that I doubt I could get in now with the same record I had in HS. So many kids whom I thought deserved a place at my alma mater were shut out because of their comparatively weaker academic backgrounds, despite decent SAT scores. Whether more AP courses or an IB diploma would have helped, I honestly cannot say. They certainly could not have hurt.

  12. Reply ObserverNY Apr 10,2009 11:53 am

    eljefe,

    I said:
    “The claims of admission to prestigious universities mean nothing, those very same students most likely would have been in the top 10 of their class with or without IB and would have been admitted to those schools anyway with AP.”

    To which YOU replied:
    By this argument, no school need offer either AP or IB, since the top 10% of any class would be admitted to top universities anyway.

    Eh, eh, eh! You don’t get to change the parameters of the argument by arbitrarily tossing AP to the curb and changing my statement.

    Try again.

  13. Reply wheelhouse Apr 17,2009 4:16 pm

    As I said in my post on the previous thread: let’s try some facts.

    Here is the official mission statement from the IBO website:

    The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

    To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

    These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

    First off, there is absolutely nothing in this statement that promotes one nation’s ideas or practices above those of any other nation, nor does it imply in the least that there is some one-size-fits-all belief system that all individuals or groups should adopt. In fact, the statement explicitly honors the “differences” among communities without encouraging any student to abandon her/his own.

    Moreover, IB’s critics seem to have forgotten one crucial fact: the program is offered in over one hundred and thirty countries. The mission statement doesn’t change when IB is taught in a Belgian school or an Bolivian school or a Tunisian school. The Cambodian IB student is being taught to understand core United States values as much as the IB student in Indiana is being taught to understand core Azerbaijani values. But none of those students are being asked to devalue their own values or those of their country, so the “anti-American” arguments don’t carry much weight.

    Finally, I’ll go back to one of my points from the earlier
    thread. I interact with IB students and IB graduates — not every minute of every day, but enough to observe how they learn and what their stands are on some issues. There is nothing unpatriotic or subversive going on with these youngsters. Really. They come from all walks of life and they wear all sorts of political and theological stripes — and, to the best of my knowledge, none of them changed religions or developed contempt for America on the basis of their education. They simply learned more about Central and South America than a lot of their peers…and more about North America as well.

    There’s always more when it comes to a subject like IB, but this post plus the post from the other thread pretty much sum up my position. I’m relying on facts and remaining reasonable, and I hope all parties here can try to do the same.

  14. Reply ObserverNY Apr 18,2009 9:10 am

    wheelhouse,

    “who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.”

    The concluding line of the IBO mantra is the one that always cracks me up the most. There should be a caveat added to that: Unless you disagree with or dare to question IBO, in which case you are very,very,wrong.

    “the program is offered in over one hundred and thirty countries.”

    IBO has found buyers in over 130 countries. The overwhelming majority, but still a tiny fringe group in the scheme of things, are in the U.S. As of today, there are only 669 IB DP schools in the United States.

    “The Cambodian IB student is being taught to understand core United States values as much as the IB student in Indiana is being taught to understand core Azerbaijani values. But none of those students are being asked to devalue their own values or those of their country, so the “anti-American” arguments don’t carry much weight.”

    You really believe that, do you? When did it become IBO’s right to teach children what American core values are? Isn’t that my responsibility as an American parent? IBO should be teaching children FACTS, math, science, history, grammar – NOT providing an IB/UN interpretation and spin on what VALUES American children should be learning.

    And while IB students may learn MORE about other countries, they learn LESS about the history of their own country. IB History of the Americas only covers modern history, the past 100 years. To meet State requirements, districts have to spend extra money for teachers to spend time on curriculum development to fill the huge IB gap.

    I too, am relying on facts. It boils down to WHICH facts different people consider more important.

  15. Reply NH Apr 18,2009 10:41 am

    If they are American-centric, why do they construct mock UN assembly rooms and not a mock US Congress?

    Let’s face it, even without IB, schools have become laboratories for the left and if you just listen to interviews with random young people, they will tell you they believe in Marxism, because it was presented to them with equal validity to capitalism.

    FACE IT, this program and our public educational system in general is intended to created social activists out of our children and teach them allegiance to world government. Any teacher that participates in this travesty should be fired.

  16. Reply wheelhouse Apr 18,2009 11:24 am

    ObserverNY:

    There is no evidence that those who question IBO are considered “very, very, [sic] wrong.” Those who discuss the issue with you here and on other websites obviously disagree with you on some key points. And yes, it often comes down to which facts one finds and how two parties interpret the same facts. But please read your own posts and consider carefully how you express your views. First, there are some rational gaps: for instance, it cannot possibly be your “responsibility as an American parent” to teach a Cambodian student about American values — I imagine we would agree that your parental responsibilities end with your children. (And by the way, asking, “You really believe that, do you?” amounts to nothing more than taunting.) As for the “UN spin,” I appreciate your concern, but a program designed to educate young citizens from many different countries has no choice but to try and present a broad, international perspective — and your assertion that the UN somehow controls IB is still unsupported. As for learning less about North America, I must remind you that I do interact with IB graduates often, and they all appear to know more about North American history and culture than their peers. They also are more adept at math, science, and grammar, all of which you justifiably cite as criteria for a sound program. You seem unwilling or unable to respond to those statements, which seem pretty straightforward to me.

    So, your protests notwithstanding, you do not actually deal in facts as you claim you do. More often you are dealing in assumptions based on a commendable amount of secondary research, but also on meager first-hand experience. What your posts strongly suggest is an ironclad set of opinions that run much deeper than your feelings about this particular program; these opinions and feelings may have been in place before you even heard about IB, but we all have our lightning rods and this seems to be yours.

    With that in mind, I apologize if this comes off as a personal attack, but your posts are, in fact, personal in nature. They focus more on your mindset than they do about any International Baccalaureate mission, curriculum, or results. They also demonstrate that, though you frequently accuse others of intolerance, you are the one who most often ratchets up the tone when you are challenged. Just check when and where you employ caps — which, I assume you know, is the computer equivalent of shouting — as well as your predisposition to employ such talk-radio-friendly terms as “Kool Aid” and “Obummer.” Those are good quick throwaway lines, perhaps, but neither intellectually productive nor conducive to dialogue; that may be why the moderator moved this thread, and the fact that your comments have closed or relocated more than one thread — and not only on sites considered leftist or liberal — should tell you something.

    I really thought I had said all I needed to say after the second post, and I can feel myself getting lured into a punching match with no end in sight. Well, I pledge right now to stop no matter how many caps or silly names come back at me, so be my guest and have at it. As the kids say: peace out.

  17. Reply ObserverNY Apr 18,2009 2:11 pm

    wheelhouse,

    Did I add an extra comma? Oh my, that is a terrible offense. I’ll pay closer attention to that and my apparently annoying use of caps for emphasis. Maybe you might consider avoiding using – all the time.

    Your entire post constitutes “evidence” that anyone who questions or disagrees with IB is considered “wrong” by IB supporters. You disagree with me, therefore, in your IB opinion, I am wrong. I cannot “also be right” according to the IBO mission statement. Therein lies the hypocrisy of all that is IB.

    and your assertion that the UN somehow controls IB is still unsupported.

    And your attempt to twist my assertion is disingenuous. IBO willingly supports and promotes the UNESCO agenda all on its own. The UN isn’t twisting IBO’s arm or “controlling” IBO. IBO willingly became an NGO of the UN. IBO willingly accepts funding from UNESCO and willingly advises UNESCO. IBO willingly signed onto UNESCO’s Peace Education “treaty”. IBO willingly agreed to support the Earth Charter.

    Interestingly, I just received the Spring glossy brochure from my district which usually includes budget information. This year, our BoE and Supt. have gone into super silent mode and have not yet revealed the actual proposed budget. And surprise, surprise… not a single mention of IB in the entire 8 glossy pages of district “achievement and pride”. Why do you think that is? There is a nice little feature on a student at the Model UN Conference who won an award for “Outstanding Position Paper” for his representation of Syria in the UN General Assembly’s Disarmament and International Security Committee. Do you think my district isn’t proud of being an IB World School? Why wouldn’t they mention this “prestigious” program? After all, they spend close to $200,000 a year for it, but not a single mention.

    As the old hippies say,
    whirled peas

  18. Reply eljefe Apr 19,2009 9:01 am

    NH — If they are American-centric, why do they construct mock UN assembly rooms and not a mock US Congress?

    Not too relevant a question. I attended a non-IB public school on Long Island, and we had a Model UN activity. So did a lot of other schools in NY, because there was a big Model UN conference our activity had to prepare for. We did not have a Model Congress — I guess because student government was supposed to imitate it.

    Besides, are you implying that ALL IB schools have to construct mock UN assembly rooms? I doubt that is the case, or even that it is a requirement.

    Let’s face it, even without IB, schools have become laboratories for the left and if you just listen to interviews with random young people, they will tell you they believe in Marxism, because it was presented to them with equal validity to capitalism.

    I would like to see some evidence for that statement. What interviews? When? Where?

    FACE IT, this program and our public educational system in general is intended to create social activists out of our children and teach them allegiance to world government. Any teacher that participates in this travesty should be fired.

    Painting with a really big brush there, NH, aren’t you? The American public schools are pretty disparate, since we don’t have a national system (despite NCLB). Maybe your school district is “liberal,” but there are plenty of conservative districts, too. Again, you have evidence to support your claims? Just saying the same thing over and over does not make it true.

  19. Reply eljefe Apr 19,2009 9:46 am

    ObserverNY —

    I asked these questions of you in the previous thread: “Your district apparently has an IB program in place. What are those graduates doing now? Where are they? What do they say about the experience?” I am not sure if you ever answered them, there or here. Would you care to address them now?

    You said this in the other thread:

    Infiltration of the UN/One World government’s agenda through our children’s education is the most heinous of all.

    That seems to be a pretty clear indictment of UN “control” of the IBO.

    Then Wheelhouse said here:

    As for the “UN spin,” I appreciate your concern, but a program designed to educate young citizens from many different countries has no choice but to try and present a broad, international perspective — and your assertion that the UN somehow controls IB is still unsupported.

    Then you replied:

    And your attempt to twist my assertion is disingenuous. IBO willingly supports and promotes the UNESCO agenda all on its own. The UN isn’t twisting IBO’s arm or “controlling” IBO. IBO willingly became an NGO of the UN. IBO willingly accepts funding from UNESCO and willingly advises UNESCO. IBO willingly signed onto UNESCO’s Peace Education “treaty”. IBO willingly agreed to support the Earth Charter.

    Now, you’re backpedaling. Either the UN is actively infiltrating the IB program, or it’s not. Care to clarify? And you still have not addressed his or my question how being an NGO of the UN is proof that that the IBO is part of a “one-world” conspiracy.

    Now let’s put your figures into perspective. For your district, IB costs $200K. What’s the per capita cost, either per student or per household? What percentage of the total school budget is that $200K? Your property values there in LV may have declined, but property values on LI are still pretty high compared to most of the US, so tax revenues must be decent.

    The link you gave me to the Minnesota budget solutions suggests cutting IB, to save $2.25 million on a $6,400 million state budget. Whoopee! That constitutes 0.035% of the Minnesota budget, or a really nice home on the Island. Squawking about the lofty costs of IB is fine, but try to put the costs in perspective. Two million sounds like a lot of money, but spread over an entire state population of five million it’s just pocket change.

    I have heard back from one IB high school so far. Its IB program involved only part of the school population. The coordinator told me this about costs:

    The district pays an annual fee of just under $10,000 to the IBO. This allows us to call ourselves an IBO school and offer the courses. Each teacher who teaches an IB course is required to attend training every 5-7 years (depending on when the curriculum is updated) which costs approximately $1500 per teacher, per training. It is beneficial to the school and the IB program if administrators, counselors, librarians, and non-IB teachers can also be trained. Each student enrolled in the IB Program is charged a registration fee (approximately $120) and $88 per subject taken. The district covers the registration costs and the students are responsible for their subject fees. AP students pay their AP fees of $86.

    These costs do not sound extravagant. So, again, how is IB so terribly expensive?

  20. Reply eljefe Apr 19,2009 11:45 am

    The HTML is blockquote quoted stuff /blockquote — in angle brackets. I did the formatting for you this time.

    And, by the way, thanks for not answering my questions. I am doing my best to respond to yours. I rather thought you, who seem to hang on every word here, would have the time and resources to reply to mine in a timely and direct manner.

    You can dish it out when it comes to the UN/UNESCO, etc., but when I ask for specific data or information, you duck the questions. Frankly, I am disappointed.

  21. Reply ObserverNY Apr 19,2009 10:52 am

    Do over! I don’t see an edit or a delete feature, but let me try this again:

    eljefe,

    I asked these questions of you in the previous thread: “Your district apparently has an IB program in place. What are those graduates doing now? Where are they? What do they say about the experience?” I am not sure if you ever answered them, there or here. Would you care to address them now?

    These are good questions and I am going to respectfully refer you to my book for the answers. It should be released in the Fall of ‘09. 😉

    I am seriously not going to debate with you what I consider a good value in terms of real estate, taxes, percentages and cost per student. The fact remains that during this terrible recession, districts are digging deep to barely fund Federally mandated programs without making major staffing and extracurricular cuts. Teacher legacy and healthcare costs are growing exponentially. The fact remains that IB is a non-mandatory, expensive, superfluous program that should be cut. AP provides the same if not superior level of academic rigor at less than half the cost and without the additional layer of bureaucracy.

    Professor Wheelhouse

    Better get back over to U.S. News, I’m kicking your Professorial butt. 😉

  22. Reply ObserverNY Apr 19,2009 10:52 am

    what html do you use for quotes?

  23. Reply ObserverNY Apr 19,2009 1:57 pm

    eljefe,

    Thank you for formatting my post. As to hanging on to your every word, Shirley you jest. 😉

    My duck is to entice you to anticipate my manifesto in its entirety, rather than piecemeal here in your forum. I have had to wait a long time for a lot of my questions about IB to be answered, you’ll just have to hold onto your shorts for a few more months.

    At 12:45 PM EST today, President Obama announced, “I believe in the United Nations.” Frankly, Mr. President, I’m not quite sure what you believe or don’t believe in. You swore up[on a Bible to uphold the U.S. Constitution as our Commander in Chief. I would have liked to have heard the words, “But my first and foremost responsibility as the President of the United States is to uphold the U.S. Constitution”. That would have been reassuring. But instead you chose a wallflower position of sitting the Durban II dance out. That’s like saying you believe in God, but not today because He took your favorite Aunt at too young an age. You sat in a church where your Reverend screamed “Go–amn America” for 20 years, yet you claim you never heard it.

    I know what I believe in. And it’s not the United Nations or its power to govern Americans.

  24. Reply NH Apr 19,2009 4:22 pm

    Thanks for summing it up — Yes, I am saying our schools are laboratories of the left as JOHN DEWEY stated they would be LONG AGO.

    I worked in them for almost 40 years so I know. And I’m sick about it, and I don’t want ANOTHER CENT of my money put toward this nonsense.

  25. Reply NH Apr 19,2009 4:30 pm

    No one has to evade questions about the evil UN which controls schools, churches, foundations, NGOs that control governments and is used by the banking cartel to get their way.

    I suggest you watch the interviews with Aldous Huxley (Author of Brave New World) if you want to see where we are going…

    The public educational system is the single most dangerous element being used to control society into the world order, using our own tax dollars. Any smart person would just stop paying.

  26. Reply jenna Jun 20,2009 12:38 pm

    NY is obviously a right wing idiot who has been brainwashed by media propaganda

  27. Reply ObserverNY Jun 20,2009 8:21 pm

    Jenna,

    LOL! You are obviously unfamiliar with the mainstream media in the United States. But you have a nice day now, ok? 😉

  28. Reply NH Jun 21,2009 1:56 am

    @jenna: It is more of a case that media propaganda has affected people like you who are not recognizing a global marxist program when you see one, since 90% is owned and run by those who want the global government to succeed… so all their frightening suggestions (LIKE UDHR is better not the Constitution) mean nothing to you as far as how scary it all is.

    The IBO asserts that this program will further the goals of the UN, i.e. WORLD GOVERNMENT. They don’t even try to hide it.

    If you like the idea of living in Orwell’s nightmare, be our guest. We however will fight for our sovereignty and for this country’s freedom to the DEATH.

  29. Reply NH Jun 21,2009 2:02 am

    The mission statement I wa asked to sign was nothing to do with IB — this was from Goals 2000! Goals 2000 was directly related to a UN treaty and we had to promise, under school ‘reform’ we would teach world government.

    The IBO has just figured out a way to steal tax money from us while doing this.

    And I would again remind jenna that most of the medai ‘bias’ is FOR world government.

    All I can say is you young people are truly going to be robbed of your freedom and you are willingly going along with it. Shame.

  30. Reply Mike Feb 20,2015 12:27 pm

    There’s nothing good about the IB program, it’s a bunch of moral relativism designed to co-opt your children into a UN collectivist mindset and made to feel inadequate about their own country and culture. They soon become little activists for all the political issues that adults struggle with on a daily basis, but instead have had their minds made up for them by the IB curriculum and it’s incessant daily conditioning from their teachers.

    Forget about science or maths, gay marriage and communism are the term projects in PYP. IB is a clever cloak of indoctrination, designed by the people who setup the UNESCO organization, mainly communist, atheistic psychologists who wanted to destroy all religions and national sovereignty to rule by UN global communism.

    Parents of children in PYP schools have no idea what their children are learning from week to week, the constructivist teaching method is used as an excuse for not having a real syllabus, it’s a very secretive curriculum that hides social indoctrination in feel good concepts and jargon of world peace and harmony, just like communism did in Russia. Get your children out of IB while you can and give them a proper education!

    This is what your children get to study in their final and crowning year of elementary PYP.
    http://kidblog.org/PYPExhibition2014/

    Marriage Equality Issues
    Fair Trade
    Racism in Sport
    Animal Cruelty
    Issues with War Refugees
    Womens Rights
    Dangerous Diseases
    Body Image
    Racism and Refugees
    Border Patrol
    Extreme Poverty
    Mental Health issues
    Poverty and Homelessness
    Discrimination in Sports
    Human Rights

  31. Reply eljefe Feb 20,2015 4:49 pm

    The purpose of the assignments is for the kids to learn how to think critically about complex issues. That seems like a good thing, but you disagree. Here’s what one group of boys wrote about their project on border patrols.
    “Some of our weaknesses are listening, recording data and staying on task. Our strengths are viewing, the acquisition of knowledge and comprehension. Some of opportunities that exist for our team are our access to guest speakers and sources of information. Callum’s mum and dad, Jude’s dad and our mentor Mr Bunnett who has worked on the seas to protect our borders from asylum seekers and refugees.”
    Some real Commie words at the end there.

  32. Reply Amanda Apr 27,2015 8:45 am

    Can 11 years olds really think critically about border control, gay marriage, refugees and human rights or are they being persuaded to form a certain view? Most adults can’t think critically about such issues. The IB indoctrination plants seeds into these young minds so to influence their thinking. When other children are wondering in amazement at the world of science, astronomy and maths, these IB dummies are loaded with the world’s most difficult and dividing social and environmental problems, is that fair on such young children, 8-12 year old? The obvious rhetoric in IB is to persuade these children to despise their own country and the western democratic system in favor of a UN type structure with humanist and collectivist values. Get over yourself and stop pretending to be thinking about what’s best for our children while at the same time pushing your personal and social values onto them. School is a place for academic learning, not a social indoctrination platform, leave that to the communist countries.

  33. Reply Michelle May 7,2015 10:09 am

    My daughter in doing a whole term project on refugee rights and gay marriage and they don’t know about division or multiplication, so much for critical thinking and a solid educational foundation in IB! I don’t think this sort of PYP syllabus is going to help the world develop a cure for aids. The funny thing is that some of us who grew up under communism or dictatorships recognize all the attributes of those systems in the IB program, especially the PYP brainwashing of young minds and detachment from families and communities.

    Lisa is right about the Hitler youth, unfortunately it takes a whole new generation to ignore the past for such problems to reoccur. I’m afraid this blog author is one of those who conveniently forgot the past or refuses to acknowledge it at his own peril. Sad that history has to repeat itself while people go on about not repeating our past mistakes.

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