Guest blogger Will Tang: The benefits of Chinese kungfu 2

Guest blogger Will Tang: The benefits of Chinese kungfu
studentChinese kungfu has a very long history. During the last 5,000 years of China’s history, there have been many people who are good at Chinese kungfu, such as 张三丰 (Zhang Sanfeng),李小龙 (Li XiaoLong – Bruce Lee), 李连杰 (Li LianJie – Jet Li), 成龙 (Cheng Long – Jackie Chan),甄子丹 (Yen ZiDan – Donnie Yen), to name a few. When I was a child, I watched Bruce’s movies and every day wondered, “When will it be my turn to do that?” My Dad told me with a laugh, “Do you know how many Bruce Lees there are in the world? One! Only one!” I know that he wished that I live a peaceful life – grow up smoothly, find a good job, get married and bring up children. However, I have my dream to become the dragon (龙 means dragon in Chinese) like Bruce Lee who was great at kungfu. As the old saying goes, “The one who knows a son the best is his father.” “Hey, son! Why do you insist on learning kungfu?” my dad asked me once. “I want to be a famous kungfu star!” “No, it’s not that! Be sensible, please!” “Um, I want to be a stronger ...

Guest blogger 2: Trans Li — “To be an elite”

Guest blogger 2: Trans Li --
Our latest student blogger is another graduating senior, Li DongLing 李冬凌. Her English name is Trans, which is short for “translator,” her dream job. Her hometown is near the city of Changde, about three hours from here. She’s been my student since 2011. Trans is now interning in Shenzhen for an automotive tool-and-die factory. To be an elite The truth is, I am not an elite yet, and there is quite a long, hard journey ahead for me to reach that point, but I swear to be an elite in the future. It is a lifelong promise to myself. I am an ordinary girl without special talents, who comes from a small village. But looking back, life has never treated me as an ordinary girl since I was born. I dare not say I have been through many bitter and hard things. I only can say each thing that has happened to me has made me stronger and more mature. It is common to see people defeated by all kinds of troubles, and certainly I have met many troubles, too. The key for me surviving these troubles — even failures — is my own belief. I am an English major ...

Guest blogger: Will Tang – “Something about my family”

Guest blogger: Will Tang -
As the school term ended, I invited my students and other QQ followers to write something for this blog. The topics are theirs. All I have done is clean up their grammar and spelling. First to submit something was Will Tang XiongLue 唐雄略, who graduates in June this year. Will and I were both teachers at a friend’s kindergarten last year, and he’s also been my student for three years. Something about My Family I was born in 1991 in Yongzhou, which is located in the south of Hunan province. Until I was 7 years old, I lived in a beautiful country village named 毛坪里(Mao ping li). It’s a small place in Yongzhou. My grandfather had told me that 毛坪里 was a desolate place full of weeds a hundred years ago. (That was during Qing dynasty in China history.) Then three young brothers came there, worked the land, built houses, and married with women from the nearby villages. They are my ancestors. My father is a middle school teacher in town. Grandfather told me that he had experienced a lot of hardship and suffered lots of pain in order to attend school. When father was 9 years old (It was ...

Control? Open Channel C!*

JISHOU, HUNAN — There are almost a quarter million Chinese studying in the USA now, and many more who want to study in the States if they had the chance — my students among them. But a Chinese (or really any international) student coming to the USA faces a lot of challenges: the language barrier, the writing barrier, cultural differences, different attitudes about dating and sex. I do my best to explain the differences, but my experience as a college student was three decades ago. So, my information is perhaps somewhat out of date. A few months ago, I stumbled upon Channel C. Three Chinese students studying at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Pan Fangdi 潘芳迪, Niu Muge 牛牧歌 and Cecilia Miao 缪思 (Miao Si), began the project in an effort to bridge the cultural gaps between Chinese students and their non-Chinese classmates. They have their own YouTube channel and also one on YouKu, the Chinese version of YouTube. Although the three are now in different cities in the US and China, they still manage with the help of team members Ye Du 叶杜 and Stephanie Sykes to produce cogent and interesting videos about career advice, dating advice, language learning, EDM ...

Great adventures in high school journalism 2

JISHOU, HUNAN — Wonkette has already commented on this story in its inimitable way, but I haven’t written a high school press freedom blog in years. So, suffer me this rare chance. Student journalists at Fond du Lac (Wisconsin) High School did a boffo piece on rape, rape culture, and rape jokes. Scroll to the end of this linked page and read it yourself. It was well written, informative and mature, and included helpful links for readers needing counseling or advice. I mean, it was nearly professional, the kind of piece student newspapers get state and national scholastic press awards for. The administration of FDLHS spiked it. That’s right. Right now in the 21st century high school students still cannot discuss sex in print, no matter how well written and researched their articles are. If I were the principal of this school, I’d be damned proud of these kids. But, you know, I’m not the boss. And also, sex, teenagers. OMFG! The administration did not break any laws, because the Supreme Court ruled long ago that schools have the right to censor student publications if they are part of an academic course. The best we can do as sympathetic observers ...

Typography 101 2

Reminds me of all those layout sessions from my student-newspapering days. Was it Larry Dupraz who taught me about kerning? Hmmmm.

Texas HS school pulls teen mother feature from yearbook

This is old news, because I was asleep at the switch, but it’s a timeless topic, pitting well-meaning students against stuffy administrators. The editors of the Burleson (TX) High School yearbook, The Elk, planned a two-page photo feature on two teen mothers at the school, to show how they overcame the difficulties keeping their children created. The deadline for the book was Saturday. When the editors presented the book proofs to the principal, he vetoed the pregnancy spread, saying it “glamorized” teenage sex and contradicted the district’s abstinence-only sex-education curriculum. The editors took the matter up the chain of command, but heard the same response: no features on teen mothers. According to the Dallas Star-Telegram, yearbook editor Megan Estes wanted the yearbook to reflect the experiences of the entire student body, not just the jocks and brainiacs. Seniors Brittani Shipman and Robin Robertson agreed to appear in the teen mother feature. “It really hurts [the girls] when they hear people talking about them … These are people with real lives — not just something you gossip about in high school,” Estes said, according to the Student Press Law Center. The yearbook adviser, a former professional newspaper woman, and the staff ...
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