Careful, Chinese ladies, that handsome foreigner you love might be a spy 1

Careful, Chinese ladies, that handsome foreigner you love might be a spy
JISHOU, HUNAN — The Beijing government is warning its female workers that the next dashing foreigner wooing them could be a spy. For National Security Education Day, which apparently is a new thing here, the government has placed cartoon posters warning the ladies that handsome wàiguórén (foreigners) might be after more than just charming dinner conversation or Chinese lessons. No, they don’t mean sex. They mean state secrets, which if every state worker has access to, China has a bigger problem than “The Spy Who Loved Me.” The 16-panel cartoon, entitled “Dangerous Love” (危险的爱情 wēi xiǎn de ài qíng) tells the tragic story of Xiao Li, a pretty civil servant who falls for a “visiting scholar.” After he woos here with roses, dinner and probably pirated copies of banned TV shows, she inexplicably gives him secret state documents. They are soon arrested, and the final panels feature police scolding a handcuffed Xiao Li for having a “shallow understanding” of secrecy. Readers are left to imagine what happens to Xiao Li and her lover-spy next. It won’t be pleasant. There is no equivalent poster warning male workers of sultry Mata Haris exchanging sexual favors for state secrets. Apparently, the Party bosses ...

The future of China: stuffy old men vs. energized citizens

JISHOU, HUNAN — The common American assumption about China’s government is that it’s repressive, hellbent to maintain its power despite all internal or external pressures to change. But, from the perspective of someone inside China, the general population does not seem to fear the government, despite its ability to detain or “disappear” troublemakers. Among my students, associates and friends, there is a quiet willingness to criticize the government, remark on the corruption of party officials, and play along with seemingly illogical demands from higher ups while basically doing nothing about them — the Chinese version of the colonial Spanish motto,”Obedezco pero no cumplo,” — I obey, but I do not comply (with royal edicts). To be frank, I was not entirely sure my conclusions were correct until I read a lengthy essay in The Diplomat tonight by Gordon Chang, a writer for Forbes. Turns out I’m a better political and social analyst than I thought. [Reading the comments after the essay, though, it seems not everyone agrees with me or Chang.] Chang’s argument is cogent. Prosperity and electronic media have emboldened the Chinese populace as never before, as it plunges headlong into the 21st century. Meanwhile, the powerful elite men ...
WP Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com