UPDATED: China remains at 4th lowest spot in press freedom rankings in latest report

UPDATED: China remains at 4th lowest spot in press freedom rankings in latest report
JISHOU, HUNAN — China’s ranking in an annual international press freedom survey remains at #176 out of 180 countries analyzed, the same position it held in 2015. The international organization, Reporters Without Borders (Reporters Sans Frontieres – RSF), released its annual World Press Freedom Index on Wednesday, saying 2016 has been a bad year for journalists worldwide. The Index levels especially sharp criticism of China, which continues to be among the nations with the lowest press freedom rankings. UPDATE 4/27/2016: An editorial in the Chinese Communist Party news outlet, Global Times, scoffs at the ranking, claiming Reporters Without Borders ignores the differences between developed nations and developing nations. The constructiveness of journalism is more important than press freedom to developing countries. This constructiveness includes press freedom and supervision of the media, however it must incorporate understanding of different local political and economic development. The purpose of journalism is not to advocate its absolute freedom, but to help advance societal progress in a suitable way. Or, as President Xi Jinping has insisted, to serve the Party. In its summary of the Asia-Pacific region, RSF writes: In China (176th), the Communist Party took repression to new heights. Journalists were spared nothing, not ...

Hong Kong wonders what happened to 5 missing booksellers

Hong Kong wonders what happened to 5 missing booksellers
Despite the promise of “one country, two systems” when the British handed Hong Kong back to China, it seems the mainland has a different interpretation of the agreement than Hong Kong does. Five Hong Kong booksellers have gone missing, and Hong Kong authorities suspect the mainland government has something to do with it. The book dealers sell gossipy and very popular books that are highly critical of Beijing leaders, including President Xi Jinping. From the South China Morning Post: Lee Bo, 65, was last seen on Wednesday in the Chai Wan warehouse of Mighty Current, the publishing house that owns the bookstore. He vanished weeks after his four associates went missing in similar circumstances. Gui Minhai, owner of the publishing house, disappeared while on holiday in Thailand. Missing person reports were made about three others who disappeared after visiting the mainland separately: bookstore manager Lam Wing-kei; general manager of the publishing house Lui Bo; and business manager, Cheung Jiping. Lee’s wife has said her husband called her from Shenzhen the night he disappeared. He told her he was “assisting in an investigation” about the missing associates. She found it strange that Lee talked to her in Putonghua instead of Cantonese. ...

Protesters in Guangzhou demand greater freedom of press in China

JISHOU, HUNAN — Government censorship of the Guangzhou newspaper Southern Weekend prompted a walk-out and public protest by the newspaper’s staff, a rare event in China. Even more remarkable: the police didn’t shut it down. Two journalists from The Economist’s China desk explain what’s going on in Guangzhou, and talk about civil rights matters in China. (The video will play automatically once you open the complete post. My efforts to stop autoplay failed.)
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