Big news: some bad, some good 1

Big news: some bad, some good
JISHOU, HUNAN — I’ve been quiet here for the last two weeks, because I have been very, very busy, and not just for the usual end-of-the-term onslaught of activities. I learned on June 2 that I had “aged out” of my job here in Hunan, and would need to leave China no later than June 30. That’s the bad news — a forced separation from this place and the people I’ve grown to love. While I can still visit, I can no longer teach in Jishou on a work visa, because in April Hunan province enacted a new rule — 60 is the maximum age for a work visa. I’m now 61. Now for the good news. Within a few days of posting my resume on Dave’s ESL Café I was offered a job at the Henan University of Technology in Zhengzhou. There, the maximum age is 64 (I asked several times to be sure), so conceivably I can work there another three years if I like — or as long as the province or the city doesn’t abruptly change the rules to screw over the foreigners again. In fact, several English language schools in China sent me offers, but ...

You say visa, I say ‘why sir?’ 1

You can’t get into China without a visa. Sure, I had a signed contract and plenty of emails zipping back and forth between here and Hunan to give the new job a semblance of reality, but … you can’t get into China without a visa. So when the visa documents came in the mail last Thursday, the China sojourn finally moved from the nebulous to the definite. Only one more hoop remains to jump through — get the bloody thing pasted into the passport. Taking a job overseas requires a few extra steps than just moving across these United States. To teach in China, you need (a) a job offer (duh!), (b) an invitation letter from the State Administration of Foreign Expert Affairs, (c) an invitation letter from the local Chinese Public Security Bureau, and (d) the aforementioned visa. The Chinese employer generally takes care of (b) and (c), since they must originate from local government offices, once you provide the necessary documents (photos, medical examination forms, copies of passports and credentials). This process takes a couple of months. Without (b) and (c), you can’t get a Z-visa (for “foreign experts”), so I was on pins and needles until the ...
Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com